Dec
21

AllHipHop.com Daily News – : AHH Stray News: Asher Roth Not Gay, Kay Slay Sued, Common, Hip-Hop High

AHH Stray News: Asher Roth Not Gay, Kay Slay Sued, Common, Hip-Hop High

Monday, December 21, 2009 11:31 AM | 40 comments

By Ace Cannon

Get Alerts

DJ Vlad, who serves as Executive Vice President of Loud.com/SRC Records has come forward to dismiss rumors about Asher Roth’s sexuality. Reports surfaced last week that Asher Roth had “come out of the closet” during an interview about Clay Aiken on the E! Channel, which was also supposed to be airing Roth’s coming out announcement as well. “Asher Roth is not gay, and is not scheduled to be interviewed on the E! Channel. Furthermore, Asher has not been dropped from SRC Records, and is a top priority at the label after having sold over a million copies his “I Love College” single,” DJ Vlad said in a statement. “Asher is currently working on his next album for SRC.”

DJ Kay Slay has been hit with a copyright infringement lawsuit in Manhattan Federal Court. The lawsuit was filed by a pair of songwriters named Raymond and Richard Grant. The Grant’s claim DJ Kay Slay illegally used a sample of their song “Angels Around Me” on his track “Angels Around Me” which featured cameo appearances by 50 Cent and G-Unit. The song was produced by DJ Twinz and is featured on DJ Kay Slay’s 2004 album The Streetsweeper Vol.2-The Pain From The Game. Also named in the lawsuit is Loud Records and Sony BMG Music.

Rap star Common has teamed with New York based club Giant Step to ring in the New Year in Miami. Common will be the featured artist at this year’s New Year’s Eve party in The Florida Room at the Delano. The rapper will be backed by his live band during the intimate performance for the 200 people who manage to grab tickets. Also on the bill is Baltimore native Rye Rye, DJ Mateo DiFontaine and DJ Tommy Ryk.

The Portland Oregon school board has officially approved a new charter high school that will highlight Hip-Hop music and culture. The school board unanimously approved the high school in a 6 to 0 vote paving the way for The High School of Recording Arts Portland to open in 2011. The next 18 months will be spent developing the schools curriculum according to local news reports. The school’s goal is to prepare students for society through education and incorporating hip hop culture. A number of popular local rappers also participated in the development of the curriculum including versatile of the local group Lifesavas as well as hometown favorite rapper Cool Nutz.

via AllHipHop.com Daily News – : AHH Stray News: Asher Roth Not Gay, Kay Slay Sued, Common, Hip-Hop High.

 

Dec
21

Shadow And Act » Diversions – Portland School Board Approves Hip-Hop High School

Diversions – Portland School Board Approves Hip-Hop High School

By Tambay, on December 21st, 2009

Interesting…

From OregonLive.com:

The Portland Oregon school board has officially approved a new charter high school that will highlight Hip-Hop music and culture. The school board unanimously approved the high school in a 6 to 0 vote paving the way for The High School of Recording Arts Portland to open in 2011.

Organizers include some of the area’s top hip-hop artists such as Vursatyl of the group Lifesavas and Cool Nutz. They envision a public charter school where students could explore hip-hop music and dance, delve into hip-hop culture and graduate with a high school diploma, prepared for college and possibly a recording contract.

“Kids are dropping out or not finishing school,” Vursatyl said. “We’re at a point where we need to find as many things as we can that are incentives for kids to be in school. Music sets the stage.”

The next 18 months will be spent developing the schools curriculum according to local news reports.

The school aims to serve about 200 kids each year. Part of the school’s program will focus on recording arts such as dance, spoken word or rap, but students also will take algebra, world history and biology.

The key is to integrate the studies and meet Oregon high school standards, said Jason Petty, a teacher and hip-hop artist who is helping develop the curriculum.

via Shadow And Act » Diversions – Portland School Board Approves Hip-Hop High School.

 

Dec
16

The Argus Observer | Online – News

Portland school board OK’s new hip-hop high school

Wednesday, December 16, 2009 10:44 AM PST

PORTLAND (AP) — The Portland School Board has given its blessing to establishing a new charter high school in 2011 that highlights hip-hop music and culture.

Proponents of the High School for Recording Arts Portland will spend the next 18 months strengthening their academic curriculum.

The school board vote was 6-0 Monday night. While several board members said they had concerns about the school’s academic curriculum, they also said they appreciated the school’s potential to draw students who aren’t being served in the current system. The new school’s director, Erica Jayasuriya, said its mission is to prepare students to be successful in society while engaging them through the recording arts that include hip-hop music, dance, spoken word and art. The new school aims to serve about 200 students.

‘‘When we started this process, I had mixed feelings about this application,’’ said Bobbie Regan, who chairs the board’s charter school committee. ‘‘As time has gone on, I’ve come around, in part because the applicant has been so willing to work with us.’’ Charter schools are part of Oregon’s public school system, but they operate under different regulations that typically support more flexible ways of learning.

School district staff reviewers praised the charter school’s plans for proficiency-based and career-focused education. Students will be required to complete projects for credit and work under personalized learning plans. The reviewers also liked the school’s idea of creating 12 areas in which students must show proficiency to graduate. However, board members wanted to see specifically how those areas of proficiency connect to Oregon state standards. All board members said they were concerned about the low achievement scores posted by the High School for Recording Arts Minnesota, a 12-year-old charter school in St. Paul, Minn., that is sharing some of its strategies with the Portland school.

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The next step is for the district and the school’s developers to start meeting to create a formal contract outlining expectations for academics, funding, enrollment and progress reports.

Information from: The Oregonian, http://www.oregonlive.com

via The Argus Observer | Online – News.

 

Dec
16

Portland school board OKs new hip-hop high school | KOMO News | Seattle News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News – Seattle, Washington | Local & Regional

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) – The Portland School Board has given its blessing to establishing a new charter high school in 2011 that highlights hip-hop music and culture. Proponents of the High School for Recording Arts Portland will spend the next 18 months strengthening their academic curriculum.

The school board vote was 6-0 Monday night. While several board members said they had concerns about the school’s academic curriculum, they also said they appreciated the school’s potential to draw students who aren’t being served in the current system.

The new school’s director, Erica Jayasuriya, says its mission is to prepare students to be successful in society while engaging them through the recording arts that include hip-hop music, dance, spoken word and art.

The new school aims to serve about 200 students.

via Portland school board OKs new hip-hop high school | KOMO News | Seattle News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News – Seattle, Washington | Local & Regional.

 

Dec
15

Portland School Board approves recording arts charter school | OregonLive.com

Portland will have a new charter high school in 2011 that highlights hip-hop music and culture. Creators of the High School for Recording Arts Portland will spend the next 18 months building more community partnerships and strengthening their academic curriculum.

The Portland School Board voted 6-0 Monday night to approve the publicschool, which aims to serve about 200 students using an arts-integratedcurriculum, hip-hop music and credit by proficiency.

Though many board members said they had lingering concerns about theschool’s academic curriculum, they also said they appreciated theschool’s innovation, creativity and potential to draw students whoaren’t being served in the district’s current system.

“When we started this process, I had mixed feelings about thisapplication,” said Bobbie Regan, chair of the board’s charter schoolcommittee. “As time has gone on, I’ve come around in part because theapplicant has been so willing to work with us.”

The school won’t open until fall 2011, meeting a Portland Public Schools’ recommendation to postpone the launch to better coincide with the district’s plan to reorganize its regular high schools.

Charter schools are part of the state’s public school system, but theyoperate under different regulations that typically support moreflexible ways of learning and programs that the regular system doesn’tprovide.

“What happened here is proof that good working relationships are whatmake positive change in our community,” said Erica Jayasuriya, therecording arts school’s director. “It’s proof that this community cancome together as an act of service, to truly see a need and take theinitiative.”

The school’s mission, she said, is to prepare students to be successfulin society while engaging them through the recording arts that includehip-hop music, dance, spoken word and art.

District staff reviewers praised the charter school’s plans forproficiency-based and career-focused education. Students will berequired to complete projects for credit and work under personalizedlearning plans. The reviewers also thought the school’s idea to create12 “validations” — areas in which students must show proficiency tograduate — was innovative.

But board members wanted to see more specifically how those validationsconnect to Oregon state standards. All board members said they wereconcerned about the low achievement scores posted by the High Schoolfor Recording Arts Minnesota, a 12-year-old charter school in St. Paul,Minn., that is sharing some of its strategies with the Portland school.

Part of the school’s focus over the next year will be continuing torefine the curriculum to ensure academic rigor, organizers said.

School board member Dilafruz Williams wasn’t at the meeting but sent aletter, saying she didn’t think the school had a strong enough academicfoundation and would pull students from schools that already had lowenrollment.

The school board’s student representative, Henry Johnson of Grant HighSchool, said he wholeheartedly supported the High School for RecordingArts.

“I think it’s an awesome way to engage students, to keep culturallyrelevant with students today by keeping up with what their interestsare,” Johnson said.

Now, the district and the school’s developers will start meeting tocreate a formal contract outlining expectations for academics, funding,enrollment and progress reports on how the work is going.

– Kimberly Melton

via Portland School Board approves recording arts charter school | OregonLive.com.

 

Dec
14

Board vote adds new hip hop charter school to district

BY JENNIFER ANDERSON

The Portland Tribune, Dec 14, 2009, Updated Dec 15, 2009 (11 Reader comments)

JAIME VALDEZ / PORTLAND TRIBUNE

Erica Jayasuriya shows to CD that she made to Khalid Muhammad Mosley, Dominique Bailey, Alex Banks and Kahlil Jayasuriya, who are hip hop enthusiasts at Jefferson’s Young Men’s Academy and supporters of The High School for Recording Arts Portland charter school. Jayasuriya urged the school board in early November to approve the new charter school.

Cue the music.

Five months after it was proposed, the High School for Recording Arts Portland is close to becoming a reality.

The Portland School Board voted 6-0 Monday night to approve the application for the proposed hip hop charter school, which would focus its academics on youth culture as a way to help at-risk students succeed.

Board member Dilafruz Williams was not at the meeting. Williams said earlier she did not support the proposal and voted against it in a subcommittee.

The new high school would open to about 200 students in September 2011 in one of three potential locations: the unused music wing of the Jefferson High School building, or in the Madison or Roosevelt high areas.

Early this month, the board’s charter school subcommittee voted 2 to 1 to recommended the application to Superintendent Carole Smith for approval. Williams had questioned how the arts-based curriculum could integrate all of the academic subjects, as proposed.

Smith has approved the application and the full board is set to make the final decision. In her letter of approval, Smith notes how the application meets all of the criteria for an instructional program, financial base and demonstrated and sustained support in the community.

However, she notes two major concerns: timing and location.

In terms of the charter school being developed outside the district’s larger high school system redesign, Smith warns that it “could be detrimental to both the program development and the overall intentional cohesiveness of the system.”

By not being an intentional part of the new system, she says, the charter school “may not be an appropriate complement to other programs in the new system and we may lose opportunities to maximize the incorporation of this program in the overall system design.”

via Board vote adds new hip hop charter school to district.

 

Dec
04

Portland school committee recommends approval of hip-hop high school | OregonLive.com

The Portland School Board’s charter school committee recommended approval of the High School for Recording Arts Portland — the first recommended approval by that committee in at least four years.

The committee passed the resolution in a 2-to-1 split vote Friday morning.

If the full school board approves the charter application at the Dec. 14 board meeting, the High School for Recording Arts Portland would be the 10th charter to operate within Portland Public Schools’ boundaries. The district has more charter schools than any other place in the state, but it also has a tougher application than most school districts and turns down most applications.

Superintendent Carole Smith also recommended the Portland School Board approve the charter school, which wants to use an arts-integrated curriculum, hip-hop music and credit by proficiency to serve about 200 students.

But Smith’s report also recommended the school revise its budget, provide a more detailed curriculum outline and consider postponing the opening to 2011 in order to integrate the school into the district’s high school redesign process.

Supporters said the school was an innovative idea that could engage disinterested students by drawing from hip-hop music and other recording arts.

Board member Dilafruz Williams cast the only dissenting vote among the three committee members, saying the school didn’t have a strong enough academic foundation.

“I don’t understand how, through the recording arts, you will be able to teach all those other critical subjects — math, science, physics, algebra,” Williams said. “I appreciate the strength of the recording arts. But we are in the business of doing that other academic piece and not the recording arts.”

All board members said they were concerned about the low achievement scores posted by the High School for Recording Arts Minnesota, a 12-year-old charter school in St. Paul, Minn., that is sharing some of its strategies with the Portland school. Since it is not a replication of the Minnesota school, board members can’t use concerns about the Minnesota school as a reason to deny the High School for Recording Arts Portland.

Bobbie Regan, chairwoman of the committee, said it was critical that the school be willing to postpone its opening one year and if not, that might sway her to deny the charter school application.

Erica Jayasuriya, the charter school’s director, said it would be amenable to waiting if the school could use the next year to continue developing its curriculum and potential sites.

Martin Gonzalez, who also voted in favor of the application, said the district shouldn’t force its timeline on the charter school. He said Portland has an opportunity to give many students a second chance, a reason to get engaged in school. He also recounted the way that he has seen hip-hop music impact his sons and bring together youth from different backgrounds.

“I’m with you on the need to make sure there is clarity on how the classes increase the skill level and achievement,” he said. “But when I was listening to the comments of folks who testified at the hearing, those were the most powerful testimonies I heard in a long time. Instead of talking about it on a theoretical level, they testified about what this opportunity actually did for them.”

– Kim Melton

via Portland school committee recommends approval of hip-hop high school | OregonLive.com.

 

Nov
07

Hip-hop high school organizers face tough questions from school board | OregonLive.com

The song recorded by three students told personal stories of how hip-hop influenced and inspired their lives: “We are the music, the culture, we are the dance,” the chorus rang out. “Join us, together, our efforts can heal our land.”

The audience clapped, and nearly 10 community members, artists, parents and students spoke to Portland School Board members Monday, seeking support for what they hope will become the district’s next public charter school: the High School for Recording Arts Portland.

Then, the tough questions began.

Board members began by asking project director Erica Jayasuriya why she chose to start the school in Portland.

Jayasuriya recounted her frustration in finding a place for her multiracial son, now 13, to go to a school that nurtured his identity and musical ability.

“We don’t have anything that really reflects an arts-integrated curriculum,” Jayasuriya said. “We really love Portland. It was either move or we create that kind of school.”

Earlier in her presentation, Jayasuriya explained the school’s mission — to prepare students to be successful in society while engaging them through the recording arts that include hip-hop music, dance, spoken word and art.

The charter high school hopes to serve about 200 students starting next fall and plans to operate from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., a schedule the developers say is more in line with student sleep patterns and takes advantage of the hours when adolescents are most alert. Students also could earn passes to work in the studio from 5 to 8 p.m.

District staff reviewers praised the charter school’s plans for proficiency-based and career-focused education. Students will be required to complete projects for credit and work under personalized learning plans. The reviewers also thought the school’s idea to create 12 “validations” — areas in which students must show proficiency to graduate — was innovative.

The validations are intended to shift the focus for students away from achieving a certain grade and put the emphasis on showing mastery of certain concepts and subjects, school organizers said.

But members of the board’s charter school committee asked for more information about how the validations connect to Oregon state standards. They also asked for more information about the school’s model program in Minnesota and how it performs in academic achievement areas.

Tony Simmons, development director for the 12-year-old High School for Recording Arts in St. Paul, Minn., said the school performs on par with comparable high school programs in reading and writing, but acknowledged the school’s students still struggle in math.

Board members also wanted to know how the Portland school would respond if drops in school funding continued and its $900,000 projected budget were to unexpectedly decrease.

Jayasuriya said the Portland-based team would work closely with its sister school to navigate the uncertain financial picture in Oregon. In its 12 years, the Minnesota-based school has never had to access a line of credit or spend more money than it generated through enrollment and partnership, Simmons said.

Portland Public Schools Superintendent Carole Smith will make a recommendation later this month on Jayasuriya’s application to the charter schools committee, and the committee will follow with a recommendation to the full school board.

– Kimberly Melton

via Hip-hop high school organizers face tough questions from school board | OregonLive.com.

 

Nov
05

District gets ‘tight’ with hip hop charter plan

BY JENNIFER ANDERSON

The Portland Tribune, Nov 5, 2009 (7 Reader comments)

JAIME VALDEZ / TRIBUNE PHOTO

Erica Jayasuriya, backer of a proposed recording arts charter high school, shows her son and three of his friends a copy of the school’s “anthem” before a recent public hearing before a Portland Public Schools committee. The boys, eighth-graders at Jefferson’s young men’s   academy, say they would attend the charter school next year if it comes to fruition.

To people of a — ahem — certain age, a school of hip hop might sound more like a joke than a serious way to spend taxpayers’ money.

But that’s exactly the point of the proposed High School for Recording Arts Portland: It isn’t supposed to appeal to middle-aged white men.

It would offer hip hop — an umbrella term for the music, media, technology and arts culture of today’s youth — as a hook or incentive to get kids engaged in their studies and motivated and ready for a career or college afterward.

That’s according to supporters of the effort, who pleaded their case to members of the Portland School Board’s charter school committee on Monday.

“This type of thing is the type of thing Portland does,” said Elijah Hasan, a teaching artist in Portland schools who described how he took a photography class at Irvington School at age 9, spawning his lifelong interest.

“It’s a town of artists. It would be very nice to see Portland nurturing artists at a young age,” he adds.

If approved by the Portland School Board in December, the proposed charter school could open to 250 students next fall amidst the chaotic backdrop of a district wide high school redesign effort.

If approved, it would be the eighth charter school in the district. As of 2007-08, there were slightly more than 1,000 students in the district’s charter schools, representing just more than 2 percent of the total enrollment.

Nationally, charter schools are a hot topic since President Obama is investing in them as hubs of innovation. That federal support has trickled down to the Oregon Department of Education, which awarded 10 grants with federal money to charter school applicants throughout the state earlier this year.

Erica Jayasuriya, 40, a longtime Waldorf school teacher in Portland who is leading the recording arts school effort, received one of the grants out of a field of 28 applicants.

She used the first installment of $55,000 for outreach and planning. If the charter goes forward, two more installments of $225,000 will come during the next two years to support professional development and curriculum work to get the school up and running.

The money and state support has been a huge help, she says. Their relatively fast pace toward approval is evidence of that.

“In Portland, this is fairly unique — that they are conditionally approved the first time they went before the board,” said Jake Weigler, state education department spokesman. “Every applicant before, the district has usually asked them to go back and rework some parts of it … That’s a strength of their application, we believe.”

via District gets ‘tight’ with hip hop charter plan.

 

Nov
05

Recent stories spark questions about hip-hop and education | OregonLive.com

Recent stories spark questions about hip-hop and education | OregonLive.com.

 

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